Siris

wpid-p20131030-161730.jpgAbout Siris Amsterdam…

I am French photographer living in New York City.
I have three cameras and they live with me.
I wish every single picture I take, whether a portrait of a legendary rock critic or a glass reflecting the blue mosque of Beirut, were a witness of my own emotions.
I take portraits of people I meet, rendering the way they feel it themselves, or how I want to express their own emotions.
I take pictures of places I like, capturing “what matters”, what emotions, again, will be kept in my memory.
I like subjects and I like projects, exploring “things that matter”, like this woman taking a bath before her wedding night.

I want these pictures to be timeless, because my subjects are immortal. I still have a long way to walk to those places and achieve that goal.

Meanwhile, I am this obsessional photographer, a serial shooter. A unstable, volatile, and dangerous dreamer who believes in himself, using photography to understand what that means. I am not sure I believe in God but I wish God believes in me, taking me in physical or emotional places where he wants me to click the shutter.
Jean-Philippe

About André Kertész…

06André Kertész (2 July 1894 – 28 September 1985), born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism. (source Wikipedia) 

After the death of his wife, André Kertész consoled himself by taking up a new camera, the Polaroid SX70. As with earlier equipment, he mastered the camera and produced a provocative body of work that both honored his wife and lifted him out of depression.Here Kertész dips into his reserves one last time, tapping new people, ideas, and tools to generate a whole new body of work through which he transforms from a broken man into a youthful artist. Taken in his apartment just north of New York City’s Washington Square, many of these photographs were shot either from his window or in the windowsill.

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